Insurance Blog

One conundrum many drivers face is knowing when to file an auto claim. This is one of the most perplexing questions, especially since there are financial and time constraints tied to claims submissions.

First and foremost, filing a claim can be dependent upon requirements mandated by your auto insurer and state regulations. Time is of the essence; it is imperative for a claims adjuster to be able to investigate the damage in a timely fashion. Here are some situations that can help you determine if you need to submit a claim or not.

Scenarios when a claim must be filed:

  • If you are involved in an auto accident and anyone is injured, you need to file a claim. This is especially important if you may be found at-fault in the accident. Not filing a claim can leave you open to litigation, since injuries may result in medical expenses.
  • Accidents where it isn’t clear who is at fault. A claim should be submitted for auto accidents that result in either injuries and/or property damage as a result of a crash with another party. This allows your insurer to properly represent you. Vehicle damages that may appear minor can actually be deceivingly expensive. Also, sometimes injuries manifest 24 to 48 hours after a crash.
  • Weather-related damage and vandalism. Significant vehicle damage caused by a storm (downed limbs, flooding, etc.) necessitates a claim. As does vehicle vandalism caused by an anonymous vandal.

Claims should be submitted as quickly as possible. Thanks to mobile devices, many people can now file claims directly at the scene of an accident. Steps to consider when filing a claim:

Who doesn’t love the sunny, warm days of summer? They’re delightful! But, keep in mind that more time spent outdoors in the heat and humidity can bring on a multitude of risks for pets. As the temperature rises, be mindful of these important safety concerns to help keep your pets safe all season long.

Heat-related tips:

  • The number one heat-related rule, and we’ve all heard this before, is never, ever leave your pet in the car unattended. Even if you park in the shade. Even if you leave the windows open. Even for just a few minutes. Just don’t do it. The temperature can rise to over 100 degrees in a matter of minutes, and it’s even illegal in some states.
  • If taking your dog for walks or playing outside, try to do so in the morning or evening when it may be cooler.
  • Try to avoid prolonged exposure to hot asphalt or sand, both of which can burn the pads on your dog’s paws.
  • Provide ample shade for your pet, with tree shade and tarps being better options than doghouses. Your pet’s doghouse can actually trap heat rather than provide relief from it.
  • Make sure your pet has plenty of cool, fresh water. This goes for drinking and, well, just sitting in it. Many lucky dogs love to take a quick dip in a child’s wading pool filled with clean, cool water. And if they are like my dog, they’ll drink it while they’re sitting in it. Multi-tasking at its best!
  • Believe it or not, you can apply sunblock to your pet’s least hair-covered spots, which are ears, nose, and bellies on dogs, and ears and around eyes on cats. Make sure the sunblock is pet safe, such as epi-Pet Sun Protector Sunscreen. Some typical sunblocks such as zinc oxide can be toxic to pets. And don’t cut your pet’s hair too short. Groomed pet hair, even if it’s long, helps regulate body temperature.
Wednesday, 01 August 2018 06:02

Camp Fire Safety Tips

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How to Build, Maintain & Extinguish Your Campfire

A camp fire can be one of the best parts of camping, or provide necessary warmth to hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts. Just don’t forget your responsibility to maintain and extinguish it to prevent wild fires. With the wild fires in California happening right now, it's time to talk about fire safety to prevent damaging and life-threatening fires wherever you travel.

Keep your camp fire from becoming a wild fire!

BEFORE ...

  • Choose a spot that’s protected from wind gusts and at least 15 feet from your tent, gear, and anything ammable.
  • Clear a 10-foot diameter area around your camp re spot by removing leaves, grass, and anything burnable down to the dirt.
  • Don’t build your camp re near plants or under tree limbs or other ammable material hanging overhead.
  • If allowed, dig a pit for your camp fire, about 1-foot deep, in the center of the cleared area.
  • Build a fire ring around the pit with rocks to create a barrier.
  • Don’t use any type of ammable liquid to start your fire.
  • Gather three types of wood to build your camp re and add them in this order:
    • Tinder - small twigs, dry Kindling – dry sticks leaves or grass, dry needles
    • Kindling - dry sticks leaves or grass, dry needles. smaller than 1” around
    • Firewood - larger, dry pieces of wood up to about 10” around.

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